How to tune a monoblock car amp in 2022? Step by Step Guide

Last Updated on February 2, 2022 by Devon

monoblock car amp

If you have a car amp and want to get the most out of it, then tuning is important. If you don’t know how to tune a monoblock car amp, this blog post will teach you in 8 easy steps.

Tuning a monoblock car amp is a tricky process but not very difficult, here are some general guidelines to follow.

But firstly, you should know what is monoblock amplifier.

What is a monoblock amplifier?

Monoblock amps are basically single channel amplifiers. This doesn’t mean that it can push one speaker or run 1 subwoofer, monoblock amps are made to drive an entire full range system. Monoblock amp can be used with 1 tweeter, mid range driver and 1 woofer only!

Step 1: Gain Setting

Using an RTA, adjust the gain so that the subwoofer is getting hit with approximately 75% of the power it’s rated for. Don’t pay much attention to how loud it is at this point, just get it figured out roughly. It will be significantly louder after following step 2.

Step 2: Adjust the subsonic filter

Using an RTA, set the subsonic filter so that you just start to see peaks at approximately 20hz. There will still be significant energy at frequencies below 20hz, but this is necessary to prevent ridiculous cone movement.

You want it able to move enough so that it doesn’t distort, but not so much that it can’t reach its natural resting point.

Step 3: Fine Tune the Subsonic Filter and Phase Adjustment

Now, using your ears and an RTA, pick out a few frequencies in the 20-30hz range that are bothering you. These might be peaks or nulls. Make sure to look at the group delay plot rather than just the frequency response graph. This will help determine if it is in fact a peak or null you are hearing.

Once you’ve found these peaks/nulls, use the subsonic filter to move them down an octave by using negative values (for example, -3 will move it 3 octaves below where it is now). You may find that you need to adjust the phase of the sub out by +/-180 degrees to get rid of some peaks/nulls in this range.

Step 4: Adjusting the Phase and Crossover Frequencies for Maximum Output

Now, using an RTA, set your crossover so that you are no longer seeing any major peaks/nulls between 20-80hz.

Next, using your ears and an RTA, set the phase of the sub channel to match the mains as closely as possible (you should not see too many peaks or nulls with just bass, but if you do use no more than +/-180 degrees).

If you can’t get it too look flat and smooth, that’s okay, you just want to minimize the corrective action.

Finally, set the crossover point on the front channels so that they are no longer playing anything in the 40-80hz range when you play a bass heavy track at reference volume. This will help maximize output.

Step 5: Adjust the EQ

Now we’re just going to start messing around with the EQ and seeing what we can get out of it. Tune for max output and try not to worry about how it sounds, just get as much output as possible.

Also Read: What are the causes that make a car amplifier hot?

Here are some things that you might run into while tuning your amplifier:

– You may find that you need to reduce the gain because it is clipping badly. This happens when you are achieving max output, but not for very long.

– You may find that your sub isn’t moving much at all when you have max bass. If this is the case, your amplifier has run out of headroom and there’s nothing more you can do without a larger amplifier.

– You may find that your sub sounds overpowering and distorted even though you’ve reduced the gain because it is just hitting an insane amount of bass. This usually happens if you have all the gains cranked on every channel and multiple amps, or if you have a very long speaker wire run which causes voltage drop. In this case, the only thing you can do is turn down all the gains until your sub just starts to sound normal.

Step 6: Fine Tuning the EQ

Now, using an RTA and your ears, use trial and error to reduce any peaks or nulls in the 20-70hz range so that it sounds as smooth as possible. This is where most of your sound quality comes from, so you want it to sound as good as possible.

Once you’ve got the amp sounding smooth in the low end, set all the gains so that they are just below clipping on your amps (this will probably mean turning them down about 20%).

Finally, using an RTA, set the crossover on the front speakers so that they are not playing any frequencies below 40-50hz. This will help maximize output and give you more headroom for loud bass transients.

Step 7: Playback Volume

The key to getting good sound quality out of a subwoofer is to ensure it is hitting as few peaks/nulls as possible between 20-80hz. It is much easier to EQ out peaks/nulls in this range than it is the lower frequencies, so getting them tuned in correctly will help you get good sound quality without spending too much time on EQ.

Once you have everything tuned for max output, you can turn up the playback volume until it starts to sound bad (where you can hear clipping on the bass), and reduce it until it sounds good again. Now, any peaks/nulls that show up will be louder than they were before, so you can either re-run your RTA and double check the EQ settings, or just leave it as is.

The point of this step is to reduce bass clipping and keep the sub sounding as good as possible.

Now, using an RTA and your ears, tune for sound quality by reducing any peaks/nulls in the 20-70hz range so that it sounds as smooth as possible. This usually entails EQing out a lot of nulls rather than boosting certain frequencies.

Once you’ve got the EQ looking good, turn up the playback volume until it starts to sound bad (where you can hear clipping with bass), and reduce it until it sounds good again. Peaks/nulls that show up in the sound quality tuning stage will be louder than they were before, so you can either re-run your RTA and double check the EQ settings, or just leave it as is.

Also Read: How to wire high level input on amplifier | Step by Step Guide

Step 8: Test Drive

Now you’re ready to go test drive your system! From here on out, it’s all about tweaking your system to ensure that everything sounds as good as possible with the kind of music that you like to listen to. Remember, if you don’t like the sound of any of your amps, it is very easy to swap them for different ones!

This all is about, How to tune a monoblock car amp? If you have any questions about how to get the most out of your system, feel free to post below in comments section. Thank you for reading!

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